Category Archive

(Faux) Hanging Book Shelves

I think this is my favorite tutorial to-date from D&G’s build contributor, Machelle. I love the added embellishment of the pink rope. Unrelated to the actual tutorial, I’m also seriously loving the two-tone walls (genius!) and may or may not want to try that in my bedroom at some point!

(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
I thought a lot about what I wanted for shelving in my daughter’s room. I love the book ledges look and I definitely wanted a place for books to go and be on display but I also wanted some normal shelves for housing decorations: vases, knickknacks, prints, etc.

My solution was to combine the two-in-one shelving system with a regular shelf at the top with book ledges hanging down from them. However, having a one-year-old who pulls everything off of shelves and would soon be big enough to do that with these shelves, I knew they couldn’t really be hanging free. So these ledges were already attached to the wall and the rope is really just there for aesthetics! I love it!

(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
It’s the perfect solution I was looking for. I didn’t build any of the shelves myself which made for a much easier project! There are tons of tutorials available out there for making these kind of book/picture ledges but my rule for DIY is if I can find the same thing for a decent price, I’m not going to make it from scratch. My homemade version would never look as good as these do and buying wood, paint, primer, sandpaper, tools, etc. would probably end up costing close to the same amount, plus, your time is worth money too! I think these were a great investment but feel free to make your own if that appeals to you.

(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
Materials

Picture ledges
Floating shelf
• Drill and ¼ bit
• Level
• Rope
• Acrylic paint in choice of color
• Pencil and ruler

(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
Steps:

1. Begin by installing your selves according to the enclosed directions. I spaced mine about 12” apart on the wall. The ledges are slightly longer than the floating shelf so I took that into account when placing them so they’d all be centered.

2. Measure to the center of your ledges on the short end and then measure in about 1 ¾”. Make a mark.

3. Drill a hole through this mark. As soon as your feel your bit coming through the bottom, flip it over and drill in from that side. This will make it so the paint doesn’t chip off around the hole.

4. Do the same thing on the other end and on your other ledge/s.

5. Make a mark at the same location on both ends and the bottom your floating shelf. (Be sure you make the marks at the back of the shelf, not the front.)

6. Drill a hole here as well. Because this shelf is hollow, you will definitely want to drill in from the top and the bottom.

7. Hang on your wall.

(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
8. Cut two long pieces of rope, at least a foot longer than your shelving system, just to be sure. Tape one end tightly and do a big knot at the other end.

9. Guide the taped end through your shelf hole till it gets to the knot.

10. Guide it through the next ledge hole and then tie a knot underneath it. Do the same for remaining ledges.

11. Cut off excess rope.

12. I wanted pink rope and I really wanted the look of a painted rope rather than one I bought that way so I didn’t even search for pink rope. I simply chose a color of pink acrylic paint and painted all the visible rope. Do this step at the end for ease and to avoid paint getting rubbed off while guiding through the holes.

(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
(faux) hanging bookshelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
Machelle (Build Contributor)

click here for more build tutorials.

Copper and Marble Plant Stands

copper and marble plant holders - drifter and the gypsy blog
I used to never have indoor greenery in my house but this past year we have incorporated a lot more plants into our décor and I just love it! It really makes a huge difference in your home and brightens it up (the only downside is sometimes it is difficult to keep them alive!). As we have accumulated more green houseplants, I’ve been looking for new places to place them and finally decided it was time for some stands.

This project is really simple and similar to a few other DIY décor projects of ours like this side table! You can use any type of tile but I chose marble since it is my favorite when paired with copper. You can also spray paint the copper if you want to do a brighter plant stand.

copper and marble plant holders - drifter and the gypsy blog
Materials:

½ Copper inch pipe
Pipe cutter
– Ruler or measuring tape
– Pen/pencil
– 12×12 inch marble tile (got it from The Home Depot for $3)
– Gorilla glue
4 ½ inch copper pressure tees

copper and marble plant holders - drifter and the gypsy blog
Steps:

1. Decide how high you want the stands to be – for me I did one that was 16 inches in height and another that was closer to 26 inches. (I used the pipe cutter to cut 4 pieces at 26 inches and 4 at 16 inches.)

2. Cut two pieces per stand 9 inches long.

3. Place the 9-inch piece along one of the tile edges and use gorilla glue to secure it. Repeat on the opposite side.

4. Take the pressure tees and place at the end of both of the copper pipes.

5. Take the 4 longer pipe pieces and place in each of the pressure tees.

6. Use gorilla glue to secure the tees to the pipe pieces by just placing glue along all the creases.

7. Wait for the glue to dry. (At a minimum this should be overnight.)

8. Once the glue has dried, flip the stands up and place your plants on top!

copper and marble plant holders - drifter and the gypsy blog
These look great in groupings of 2-4 or just on their own. You can also find different sizes of tile if you want bigger or smaller stands, have fun playing around with it!

Malissa (Build Contributor)

click here for more build tutorials.

Faux marble lamp

faux marble lamp - drifter and the gypsy blog
Malissa here with a fun lamp for you all this month! The concept here is really similar to my copper pipe lamp and it is really very simple. Just make sure to carefully follow the wiring instructions! And just for those of you wondering how the marble contact paper looks in real life–it looks fantastic! I love the marble contact paper I found and I am sure any brand would look equally great.

Materials:

– Wood plaque (any shape you want, you can get these at almost any craft store)

Lamp kit

– Light bulb

– Drill

– ¼ inch drill bit

– Cardboard tube (from wrapping paper)

– Acrylic bumpers

– Screwdriver

Marble contact paper

– Spray paint (optional)

– Super glue

faux marble lamp - drifter and the gypsy blog
Steps:

1. Optional: Spray paint the wood plaque.

2. Take the cardboard tube and mark off at how high you want the lamp to be. I did about 12 inches.

3. Cut the tube.

4. Roll out the contact paper and start to peel it off. Place the tube on top and carefully roll it over the paper.

5. As you roll, make sure to get any bubbles out.

6. Cut the contact paper off once the tube is entirely covered. Cut off any excess paper.

7. Take the drill and drill bit and drill a small hole in the middle of the plaque.

8. Next, take the cord and place it through the hole through the bottom.

9. Take the tube and place it over the cord and make sure the cord just peeks out of the tube a little bit.

10. Now take the socket from the lamp kit and use a screwdriver to loosen the screws.

11. Attach the wires to the screws. You will want to take the ribbed wire and wrap it clockwise around the silver screw. Repeat with the other wire on the bronze screw. Make sure that the cord is not plugged in!

12. Place the socket cover on top of the socket.

13. Screw in the light bulb.

14. Now glue the bottom of the tube to the wood base for extra security.

15. Place four bumpers on the bottom of the plaque.

16. Plug in your lamp!

faux marble lamp - drifter and the gypsy blog
faux marble lamp - drifter and the gypsy blog
Malissa (Build Contributor)

click here for more build tutorials.

Copper Pipe Shelves

copper shelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
copper shelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
Malissa here with this month’s DIY build! And surprise, surprise there is copper in this project! I have been eyeing the beautiful industrial pipe shelves that have been floating around. So I finally got around to building them myself, although instead of using all iron pipe I used mostly copper which is a lot lighter. The weight is an important factor for me since there are no studs in my walls. Plus, it fits in well with my other copper projects.

Instead of getting wood cut to size, I went the easy route and bought plain white shelves from Home Depot. However, you can easily buy wood and stain or paint it to match whatever style you’re going for.

Materials:

– 2-3 shelves (I used these ones)

1/2” copper pipe

Pipe cutter

Flanges (2 per shelf)

Copper male adapter (2 per shelf)

– Screws (8 per shelf)

– Drill

Copper tube cap (2 per shelf)

copper shelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
Steps:

1. Cut your copper pipe using the pipe cutter. You will want to cut two pieces for each shelf in the length of the shelf width (so for me this was 10”).

2. Measure on the wall where you want your shelf or shelves to be. I bought a 48” shelf so I measured 48” along the wall where I wanted the first shelf to be and then a little below that I measured another 48” for the second shelf.

3. Mark dots about 6 inches from both edges. This is where the pipe will go.

4. Use a drill to screw in your flanges on the dots.

5. Screw in a male adapter to each flange.

6. Place one pipe piece inside the male adapter.

7. Repeat on the other side and for any other shelves.

8. Place your shelf on top of the two pipe pieces.

9. Optional: Add a tube cap to the end of the pipe pieces to create a more finished look.

10. Decorate your new shelves.

copper shelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
copper shelves - drifter and the gypsy blog
I am really hoping these shelves stay up but I am so excited to finally have shelves because I have wanted them for ages. If you’re worried about the stability of the shelves use gorilla glue to secure the pipe to the male adapter. This helps create a stronger connection, almost like you are welding them together.

Malissa (Build Contributor)

click here for more build tutorials.

Copper Pipe Jewelry Holder

copper pipe jewelry holder - drifter and the gypsy blog
I might have an addiction to J.Crew necklaces, which means that lately I have been running out of spaces to put them. So this month I decided to take it upon myself to build something to house them! This also combines two of A Joyful Riot’s favorite materials: wood and copper!

copper pipe jewelry holder - drifter and the gypsy blog
Materials:

1/2” copper pipe
Pipe cutter
– Wood plaque
1/2″ copper pressure tee
– Gorilla glue

copper pipe jewelry holder - drifter and the gypsy blog
Steps:

1. Using the pipe cutter, cut the following length of pipe, one 9” and two 5” long.

2. Take the 9 inch copper pipe piece and add gorilla glue on the bottom end and place in the middle of the wood plaque.

3. Hold it in place for a few minutes and then let it dry for at least one hour.

4. Add the pressure tee to the top of the pipe piece.

5. Add the 5 inch pieces to the sides of the pressure tee.

Adorn your new holder with your favorite bracelets and necklaces!

copper pipe jewelry holder - drifter and the gypsy blog
copper pipe jewelry holder - drifter and the gypsy blog
copper pipe jewelry holder - drifter and the gypsy blog
Malissa (Build Contributor)

click here for more build tutorials.

Wood and Copper Blocked Letters

wood and copper blocked letters - drifter and the gypsy blog
I really like decorating with short sayings and phrases so for this month’s DIY build I really wanted to make some letters. I started experimenting with a few options and ended up really liking this combination of wood and copper. I am–just like almost all bloggers–still on a copper kick! And because I don’t have a miter saw or really any good place to do real carpentry I used balsa wood. It requires no saw or special supplies so anyone can quickly whip up these letters.

wood and copper blocked letters - drifter and the gypsy blog
Materials:

– Balsa Wood (I used 1/16” balsa wood I found on Amazon)
– Copper contact paper
– x-acto knife
– Scissors
– Ruler
– Pen/pencil

wood and copper blocked letters - drifter and the gypsy blog
Steps:

1. Trace your letters on the balsa wood. I used a ruler on this step just to ensure that each letter was the same size (I made them 5” in height).

2. Cut each letter out using an x-acto knife.

3. Place some of the contact paper on each letter. I picked random placed to place the paper so I would have a good assortment of copper placement on the final saying.

4. Hang up the letters!

wood and copper blocked letters - drifter and the gypsy blog
wood and copper blocked letters - drifter and the gypsy blog

The letters are super light so you can hang then up with double-sided tape or command strips. No need to use a hammer or anything.
wood and copper blocked letters - drifter and the gypsy blog
wood and copper blocked letters - drifter and the gypsy blog
Malissa (Build Contributor)

click here for more build tutorials.

DIY Build: Geode Wall Hooks

diy build: geode wall hooks - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy build: geode wall hooks - drifter and the gypsy blog
I just moved in to a new house about two months ago and I couldn’t love it more! Except that all the walls are some variation of cream or tan. It’s not that I don’t appreciate the coziness of it, I’m just not a tan walls kind of girl. However I’m having an even harder time figuring out exactly what I do want all my walls to look like. We own now, so I can pretty much do whatever I want! Wallpaper, paint, stenciling, permanent accents, ahh there are just so many options! And with all the other rooms I am more excited to work on first I know it’s going to be a while before my entryway gets the makeover I want (whatever that is..). In the meantime we really needed some coat hooks. I hate coats being tossed on tables, chairs, doors and, inevitably, floors so this was a must-do project. I decided to make some simple wood hooks with a gem accent and I chose to just go with the ivory flow and feature some soft-colored geodes. If I’m going to have to live with tan walls, I love the cohesive monochromatic look. Any gem would be beautiful on the tip of these though (imagine some pyrite or amethyst!) and I love the look of the glamorous stone mixed with the raw wood.

diy build: geode wall hooks - drifter and the gypsy blog
Materials:

– Wood dowels, cut down to about 3” lengths

– Hanger bolts (I used #8, 1 ½”)

– Screw anchors (use drill affixed with #8 drill bit

– Gems (I found my geodes at a natural history museum gift shop but they can be found online or even in arts and crafts sections at some big box stores)

– Gorilla glue

– Measuring tape

– Level

diy build: geode wall hooks - drifter and the gypsy blog
Steps:

1. I used 7/8” wide dowels but you can use smaller or larger just depending on your gems/the look you want. Cut your dowel down to size. I just had the men at Home Depot do it for me before I left but these dowels are easy to even saw by hand.

2. Drill a hole in to one end of your dowel pieces, right in the middle.

3. Glue your gems onto the opposite end. I used gorilla glue and think it’s going to do an excellent job, even with coats being torn off the hooks constantly but use whatever you’re comfortable with. And if these hooks are pretty much just for decoration, don’t hesitate to just use a dab of hot glue. Leave to dry the appropriate amount of time.

4. Screw your hanger bolts into the hole you drilled before.

5. Locate where you want your holes to go and mark with pencil, use a level to make sure they are even.

6. Use a drill bit to drill your holes in the wall.

7. Hammer in your anchors. Again, you really only need these if your hooks will be used for hanging heavy or constantly moving things.

8. Screw in your hooks!

diy build: geode wall hooks - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy build: geode wall hooks - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy build: geode wall hooks - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy build: geode wall hooks - drifter and the gypsy blog
Machelle (DIY Build Contributor)

click here for more diy build.

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